Kirk Cameron Joins the Anti-Mormon Chorus
(Sort Of)

While a number of conservative Christian leaders raise questions about Glenn Beck’s Mormonism, Worldview Matters’ host Brannon Howse continued his attack in a conversation with Kirk Cameron about why Cameron did not participate in Glenn Beck’s Divine Destiny. Howse marveled at the “thick irony” wherein Cameron (the actor who played Buck, the converted journalist warning about the “demonic spirituality of a one world religion” in the Left Behind movies) was stepping up to critique the pluralistic spirituality promoted by Beck. In Howse’s view, the not-so-fictional Left Behind novels are being played out before our eyes.

Pastors and evangelical leaders literally locked arms with all faiths, including Imams, in a spiritual endeavor despite the clear biblical warnings of II Corinthians 6:14… The Mormon Church is now rejoicing over the public relations success that these undiscerning evangelical leaders have handed the Mormon Church by uniting with Glenn Beck in the two events that were promoted as spiritual.

Cameron, known also for his part on the television series Growing Pains and more recently nicknamed Banana-man (along with Ray Comfort) for the anti-evolution DVDs that became the source of tremendous internet humor, said he hadn’t actually been invited to be part of Divine Destiny. But he declined anyway:

I had heard that there were plans to put me on the list of speakers. I bought tickets… then there was a mix up… and I was cut from the list, if I had indeed been on a list… but I had some Christians who expressed concern…. and then I read your article and I… decided it would be best for me to wait and see how things play themselves out.

Howse asked if Beck’s apparent view that “we all pray to the same God” isn’t by definition false teaching. Cameron demurred a bit and reflected on his own conversion, explaining there was much he didn’t know about essential doctrines of the faith. “I want to be careful not to jump on somebody if they’re in the throes of understanding the truth of the Bible. We can’t condone heresy but we need to give God the room to move in people’s hearts, if that’s indeed what’s happening.”

He concluded by saying that while he wants to wait and see if Beck’s professed faith in Jesus is “real,” he is “very encouraged by the movement all around the country to get back to the foundations of our country. God is using Glenn Beck.”

It will be interesting to see if Beck’s influence can keep the anti-Mormon criticism at bay. Moreover, what if the Mormon convert from Catholicism were to have a born-again Christian conversion—to the kind of Christianity you can bet David Barton and others are “sharing” with him and which Cameron is “praying for.”

jingerso@unf.edu'

Julie Ingersoll is Associate Professor of Religious Studies at the University of North Florida. She is the author of Evangelical Christian Women: War Stories in the Gender Battles and is currently writing a book on the influence of Christian Reconstructionism.