Olympics Opening Ceremony as Satanic Ritual

Few people noticed that the opening ceremony for the Olympic Games was actually a massive Satanic ritual designed to brainwash the audience—paving the way for an invasion of evil—the New Zealand Herald reported today on the website of conspiracy theorist David Icke, which outlines the plot.

Glastonbury Tor, where the games are located, is actually a “vortex,” a site where the earth’s subtle energy can be tapped. The Olympic Bell was designed to harness this energy and release it as a “Satanic frequency” aimed at the audience. Icke’s followers were encouraged to channel heart energy during the ceremony in order to dilute the evil it unleashed. The cabal apparently carried out a similar stunt earlier this year when Madonna conducted an elaborate Satanic ritual in front of thousands of people who believed they were simply watching the Superbowl halftime show.

Identifying Satanic rituals disguised as public events is tricky, but the evidence is everywhere if you know where to look. The article on the Madonna show successfully discerned “ritualistic dance moves,” while noting that her odd headdress represented “Ba’al the Nephelim King,” as well as the Egyptian deity Hathor. But the most insidious aspect of the ritual was its use of the letter ‘M’ (as in Madonna). ‘M’ is the 13th letter of the alphabet and represents the 13 Satanic bloodlines.

Icke’s claim about the Olympic bell contains no references to Ancient Near-Eastern mythology. Instead, his authority is derived from a theory that combines occult correspondences with quasi-scientific language. He explains: 

Symbols are electromagnetic information fields that are encoded with information related to what the symbols represent. These symbols can attach to our own electromagnetic fields and psyche when we give them our unknowing attention—energy flows where attention goes. 

In other words, listening to a bell can bring you under Satanic influence—but only if you don’t know a bell has the power to do this. Knowledge is indeed power.

In his work on evil conspiracy theories, David Frankfurter describes the role of “experts in evil”—individuals with the charismatic authority to identify these signs and mobilize a community against the conspiracy. As a professional conspiracy theorist, Icke is unquestionably such an expert. Witch-finders and inquisitors typically work to explain mundane misfortunes such as disease, crop failures, and other disasters; it’s less clear why conspiracy theorists would find Satan behind mainstream cultural events.

Perhaps the appeal of a conspiracy theory involving a neutral target like the Olympic Games is simply the pleasure of the reveal. Believers receive the satisfaction of knowing they have outsmarted the Satanists while everyone else foolishly sang along with Madonna or listened to their unholy bell.

While the theories can be entertaining, when too much momentum forms behind them they have historically resulted in moral panic and the persecution of innocent people. The Satanic Panic that peaked in the 1980s and 1990s is constantly threatening to return.

This week’s Time magazine recounted the story (headline: “New Jersey Police Suspect Cult Activity in Grave Robbing”) of a body taken from a mausoleum in Pleasantville, New Jersey. As police sometimes do when no motive is apparent, it suggested the crime might have been committed by a “cult.” The article even contained a link to a piece from 1978 entitled “The Quandary of the Cults.” 

To a historian of American religion, this link came as a chilling omen that our cultural phobia of cults and conspiracies has made little progress in thirty years. At least when the New Jersey body thieves—almost certainly teenagers—are caught, they will have an excellent defense. It was not their fault they committed a pointless and shocking crime: They watched the opening ceremonies on television and the Olympics Bell bonded its Satanic frequency to their electromagnetic fields.

Joseph Laycock is an assistant professor of religious studies at Texas State University. His forthcoming books include The Seer of Bayside: Veronica Lueken and the Struggle for Catholic Tradition (Oxford University Press, 2014) and Dangerous Games: What the Moral Panic Over Role-Playing Games Says About Religion, Play, and Imagined Worlds (University of California Press, 2015).